Thursday, November 15, 2018

Bringing more #science to @Wikidata

Slowly but surely more scientific papers and their authors find their way into Wikidata. Particularly when scientists have staked their claims in ORCiD, adding is easy and obvious.

It is easy because in ORCiD every author, paper, organisation et al have their own unique identifiers. So when you add a paper, all authors who claimed to be author are already linked.

Earlier today, I added papers and co-authors for Jaume Piera. As a consequence Laura Recasens was added today and as you can see in the illustration of her co-authors, several new authors popped up as a consequence.

To do this I use a combination of tools. Reasonator is my preferred tool to display data; for scientists it tells me if he or she is known to be an author. When there are, Scholia presents the scholarly author information. Of particular relevance to me is the co-author presentation. For co-authors shown in white, no gender is given in Wikidata and when the name is an initial and a surname, I will look up the ORCiD information to find a full name. Typically that is how people are known in ORCiD.

I use the SourceMD tool for two purposes; "creating and amending papers for authors" and to "add metadata from ORCiD authors to Wikidata". It is processed in a batch job, I run one job for up to 15 authors at a time and it takes forever to run.

Other people run other jobs, a particular hat tip to Daniel Mietchen who makes sure that recent publications find their way into Wikidata and finds many other reasons to improve on what we have. All this would not be possible without the many tools by Magnus and for Scholia I do thank Finn Årup Nielsen thanks to this evolving presentation, science as a process comes alive.

There is more to do; the Wikipedia citation are in a separate database and much of its data may be found in Wikidata.. Who will merge them. Publications do cite other publications, it is a field I am not really interested in.. They are added so there must be a tool.

When you are interested in a particular scientist, a particular paper.. Just use the tools and slowly but surely we all make Wikidata a great tool to represent science fact.
Thanks,
      GerardM

Saturday, November 10, 2018

More #impact for your #science is in being a #source at @wikipedia

In a study about how students research a new subject it was found that they read the Wikipedia article first. Then they move to its sources and from there it takes off.

In order to have an impact you, as a scientist, wants to be their first getting the attention of your work. There are a few tips.
  • Make sure that you and your work are known. First make your work known at ORCiD. From there it gets into Wikidata
  • PS check out the Scholia presentation of you and your scientific work.. (example)
  • Make sure that your work can be read. Wikipedia actively seeks free reads using the OAbot.
  • Do not think that current practices of your field will benefit new scientists in the future. Many fields are not well represented at ORCiD
For your information. There is a database with the sources used in Wikipedia. The only thing lacking is that this database still needs to be integrated in Wikidata for it to gain a real impact.
Thanks,
      GerardM

Saturday, October 27, 2018

#Library #Science - Prof Dr Frank Huysmans

Mr Huysman's works at the Universiteit Amsterdam. He teaches "Library sciences" and as is usual for a scientist, he has a fair share of publications to his name.

The problem is that this field of science is not well represented in Wikidata. There were no publications to his name. Importing them from ORCiD proved problematic; only four were added out of the 22 known there. Working from what was known, it was possible to add co-authors and enrich those, seek out their co-authors and enrich them as well. The result is the current 40 publications to Mr Huysman's name.

Mr Huysman has both a Twitter and an ORCiD account. Everybody who does, in Wikidata, will have his or her profile in Wikidata updated thanks to a job that is running by Daniel Mietchen. They are the ones who publicly promote their science and in this way they gain some additional credibility.

NB when you have an ORCiD and twitter, tweet #IcanHazWikidata and you will get your Qid.

When you care about your science, do maintain your ORCiD profile because it will make your papers, your co-authors and the organisation for more visible in Wikidata.. Your #Scholia profile will get better and better and chances of being quoted in Wikipedia improve.
Thanks,
     GerardM

Monday, October 22, 2018

#Science - Ladies you work together

Yesterday I singled out a Paola Giardina because she was a co-author of someone who had SO many co-authors, I could not manage the information that was in there. Yesterday Paola had a large number of co-authors that were white (no gender info). Today there are even more present.

One thing is pretty obvious in what I see: women are more likely to work with women than men. When you want to analyse this, it is important to know the data this is based on. At this time 31% of the people with an ORCiD identifier are female. When you consider probability, it is likely that some 31% of people who have not been associated yet with a gender will be female as well.

In many universities the percentage of women studying is more than 50%. All of them get involved in research. All students are involved in the production of papers and all of them are entitled to their ORCiD and to their Wikidata identifier.

So when we want to express the notability of women in modern science, all we have to do is ask any and all scientists to make their publication details part of the open record. Slowly but surely, it will become obvious who and where the best science is produced and who collaborates with whom.
Thanks,
     GerardM

Saturday, October 20, 2018

#Accepting science; the solution is in the reading not the publishing

The most important thing religion has over science? Its papers can be read. Sources like the Bible, he Quran can be read for free. You can get *your* copy from many true believers. A copy is in your library. With science the papers that can prove to you that goldfish should be classified as endangered are behind a paywall. It is only your common sense that might say: "Hey, wait a minute.."

When Wikipedia insists on its sources, they are only functional when these sources can actually be read. This is why the Internet Archive plays such a vital role in maintaining the validity of stated facts.

Some scientists think that "the public" cannot read scientific papers. They forget that even for scientists a paper that cannot be read is a paper that does not exist in their contemplations. The public does read scientific papers. The Cochrane crowd for instance reads papers and checks particular premises for validity.. We know that scientific research of coronary disease was biased for males and as a consequence women still die. A bias like that is what they look for, it is why they reject many papers because they are basically *not* valid.

There is a lot to do about what scientific publishing should be. How it should be funded.. The base line is that when a publication is not available for anyone to read, the facts do not matter. Why believe vaccines are safe when the publications that prove it are behind a paywall?
Thanks,
       GerardM

Friday, October 19, 2018

#Wikidata - the missing #Elsevier papers

It started with a Twitter tweet.. "There is also a professor Elsevier". A search found that Professor Cornelis J. Elsevier works at the "Universiteit of Amsterdam". He did not exist at Wikidata and there was only one paper to be found for him.

Adding this one paper was done with the "Resolve Authors" tool. The Scholia tool for Mr Elsevier showed a few co-authors and in addition to this several "missing co-authors" could be found.

In order to show more papers for Mr Elsevier, more papers needed to be imported into Wikidata. This can be done for authors with an ORCiD identifier, particularly the ones with no known gender. So far they did not get much TLC. Just running the "SourceMD tool" for them will add additional papers and associate other authors to these papers as well.

This is an iterative process and I focused for no particular reason on Mrs Barbara Milani. Processing her co-authors meant that more co-authors came out of the woodwork. At this time, 13 new authors with an ORCiD identifier popped up. Once they are processed more papers will be known to Wikidata and given their relation to Mrs Milani a reasonable chance that these papers link to Mr Elsevier as well.

At this time Mr Elsevier is known to have 7 publications.
Thanks,
        GerardM

Sunday, October 14, 2018

#Wikidata - the #heart of women differs from the heart of men

The assumption that the heart of women and the heart of men are the same proved to be lethal. The "Hartstichting" is a Dutch charity that raises funds to combat heart disease. One of its studies is done by professor Hester den Ruijter of the Utrecht Medical Centre. Her study aims to map those differences and it is part of an effort to provide equal quality medical support for heart matters for both genders.

As a scientist, Mrs den Ruijter was involved in the production of many scholarly papers with many co-authors and this is best presented by Scholia. Yesterday Mrs den Ruijter was only known to Wikidata through her papers. Today she has her own item, the papers have been associated with her and so have been many of her co-authors. Many other authors have their own item who are associated with the research that indicates how the heart and its diseases differs between the genders and differs based on ethnic background.

It is vital to recognise these differences, survival relies on it.
Thanks,
      GerardM